Archives for category: Article

Schlosser Marco et al.jpgSchlosser, Marco et. al. Unpleasant meditation-related experiences in regular meditators: Prevalence, predictors, and conceptual considerations. PLoS ONE 14(5): e0216643

Publisher (Open Access)

“So far, the large and expanding body of research on meditation has mostly focussed on the putative benefits of meditation on health and well-being. However, a growing number of reports indicate that psychologically unpleasant experiences can occur in the context of meditation practice. Very little is known about the prevalence and potential causes of these experiences. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of particularly unpleasant meditation-related experiences in a large international sample of regular meditators, and to explore the association of these experiences with demographic characteristics, meditation practice, repetitive negative thinking, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Read the rest of this entry »

Wrong mindful brainLifshitz, Michael et al. What’s wrong with “the mindful brain”? Moving past a neurocentric view of meditation. In: Amir Raz and Robert Thibault (eds.), Casting Light on the Dark Side of Brain Imaging. Academic Press, 2019

Preprint | Publisher

“Meditation is trending right now. From classrooms and hospitals to business meetings and phone apps, our culture is enthralled by meditation as a powerful tool to train our brains and shape our private mental lives—to make us happier, more productive, and more peaceful on the inside. But meditation is not just about training our brains. It’s a deeply social—and fundamentally embodied—collection of cultural practices. If we reduce meditative practices to just a set of brain patterns, we miss the richness of how these practices work and ignore much of what they have to teach us about our own subjective experience.

Keywords: Mindfulness; Meditation; Neuroscience; Enactive cognition; Embodied cognition

meditative unified compassionate awareness (cover).jpgPoppy L.A. Schoenberg, Andrea Ruf et al. Mapping complex mind states: EEG neural substrates of meditative unified  compassionate wareness. Consciousness and Cognition 57, 2018: 41-53.

Publisher (Open Access)

“Specific mental training cultivates diminished self-reference, encompassing non-duality, emptiness, awakened-awareness, and compassionate experiences. We aimed to elucidate the neural substrates of four distinct, interdependent Essence-of-Mind states: (1) timelessness, (2) non-preference, non-duality, non-conceptualization, (3) the view of luminosity and limitlessness, (4) unified compassionate experience of oneness (stable awakened-awareness). Read the rest of this entry »