Archives for category: Handbook

9780199362387Jerryson, Michael (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Buddhism. Oxford University Press, 2017.  760 p. ISBN 9780199362387

Publisher | Google Books

“As an incredibly diverse religious system, Buddhism is constantly changing. The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Buddhism offers a comprehensive collection of work by leading scholars in the field that tracks these changes up to the present day. Taken together, the book provides a blueprint to understanding Buddhism’s past and uses it to explore the ways in which Buddhism has transformed in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Read the rest of this entry »

9780190464684Emma M. Seppälä et al. The Oxford Handbook of Compassion Science. Oxford University Press, 2017. 526 p. ISBN 9780190464684

Publisher |  Google Books

“How do we define compassion? Is it an emotional state, a motivation, a dispositional trait, or a cultivated attitude? How does it compare to altruism and empathy? Chapters in this Handbook present critical scientific evidence about compassion in numerous conceptions. All of these approaches to thinking about compassion are valid and contribute importantly to understanding how we respond to others who are suffering. Read the rest of this entry »

aMann, Thomas. The Oxford Guide to Library Research. Oxford University Press, 2015. (352 pages, ISBN 978-0-19-993106-4)

Google Books | Publisher

“The information world has undergone drastic changes since the publication of the 3rd edition of The Oxford Guide to Library Research in 2005, and Thomas Mann, a veteran reference librarian at the Library of Congress, has extensively revised his text to reflect those changes.

This book will answer two basic questions: First, what is the extent of the significant research resources you will you miss if you confine your research entirely, or even primarily, to sources available on the open Internet? Second, if you are trying to get a reasonably good overview of the literature on a particular topic, rather than just ‘something quickly’ on it, what are the several alternative methods of subject searching—which are not available on the Web—that are usually much more efficient for that purpose than typing keywords into a blank search box, with the results displayed by relevance-ranking computer algorithms?  Read the rest of this entry »