saving-yogis.jpgLucia, Amanda. Saving Yogis: Spiritual Nationalism and the Proselytizing Missions of Global Yoga. In: Brown, Bernardo E. & Brenda S.A. Yeoh (eds),
Asian Migrants and Religious Experience: From Missionary Journeys to Labor Mobility. Amsterdam University Press, 2018. ISBN 978-9462982321. DOI: 10.5117/ 9789462982321/CH02

Acadmia.edu | Publisher

“The portable practice of yoga first migrated through unidirectional networks that transported knowledge from India to the West in the early twentieth century. Today, yoga flows through multidirectional and reverse networks, exposing new forms of hypermobility. This chapter analyzes one of these reverse networks by focusing particularly on how North American yogis export yoga globally through proselytization, marketing, and yoga sevā (‘selfless service’) tourism. It reveals how these modern yogis construct the practice as a universal good, and the benefits of ‘doing yoga”’ are often parsed with religious language. The author argues that the current hypermobility of yoga is more productively analyzed through missiological models of proselytization and conversion as opposed to economic models of production and consumption.”

Holdings: Worldcat

9780399184383.jpgGoleman, Daniel and Richard Davidson. Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Changes Your Mind, Brain and Body. Penguin Random House, 2017. 336 p. ISBN 978-0-7352-2031-7

Publisher | Google Books

“In the last twenty years, meditation and mindfulness have gone from being kind of cool to becoming an omnipresent Band-Aid for fixing everything from your weight to your relationship to your achievement level. Unveiling here the kind of cutting-edge research that has made them giants in their fields, Daniel Goleman and Richard Davidson show us the truth about what meditation can really do for us, as well as exactly how to get the most out of it.

Sweeping away common misconceptions and neuromythology to open readers’ eyes to the ways data has been distorted to sell mind-training methods, the authors demonstrate that beyond the pleasant states mental exercises can produce, the real payoffs are the lasting personality traits that can result. But short daily doses will not get us to the highest level of lasting positive change—even if we continue for years—without specific additions. More than sheer hours, we need smart practice, including crucial ingredients such as targeted feedback from a master teacher and a more spacious, less attached view of the self, all of which are missing in widespread versions of mind training. The authors also reveal the latest data from Davidson’s own lab that point to a new methodology for developing a broader array of mind-training methods with larger implications for how we can derive the greatest benefits from the practice.”

Holdings: Worldcat

9780190464684Emma M. Seppälä et al. The Oxford Handbook of Compassion Science. Oxford University Press, 2017. 526 p. ISBN 9780190464684

Publisher |  Google Books

“How do we define compassion? Is it an emotional state, a motivation, a dispositional trait, or a cultivated attitude? How does it compare to altruism and empathy? Chapters in this Handbook present critical scientific evidence about compassion in numerous conceptions. All of these approaches to thinking about compassion are valid and contribute importantly to understanding how we respond to others who are suffering. Read the rest of this entry »