Archives for posts with tag: Mindfulness

9781138240940Ivtzan, Itai  (ed.) Handbook of Mindfulness-Based Programmes: Mindfulness Interventions from Education to Health and Therapy.  Routledge, 2019. 448 p. ISBN 9781138240940

Publisher description

“[This book] offers the first comprehensive guide to all prominent, evidence-based mindfulness programmes available in the West.

The rapid growth of mindfulness in the Western world has given rise to an unprecedented wave of creative mindfulness programmes, offering tailor-made mindfulness practices for school teachers, students, parents, nurses, yoga teachers, athletes, pregnant women, therapists, care-takers, coaches, organisational leaders and lawyers. This book offers an in-depth engagement with these different programmes, emphasising not only the theory and research but also the practice. Exercises and activities are provided to enable the reader to first understand the programme and then experience its unique approach and benefits. Read the rest of this entry »

710cdf87-6b30-4cf2-871a-f93d335f36fd.jpgPurser, Ronald. McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality. Repeater, 2019. 304 p. ISBN  9781912248315

Publisher description

“From celebrity endorsements to monks, neuroscientists and meditation coaches rubbing shoulders with CEOs at the World Economic Forum in Davos, it is clear that mindfulness has gone mainstream. Some have even called it a revolution. But what if, instead of changing the world, mindfulness has become a banal form of capitalist spirituality that mindlessly avoids social and political transformation, reinforcing the neoliberal status quo? Read the rest of this entry »

Wrong mindful brainLifshitz, Michael et al. What’s wrong with “the mindful brain”? Moving past a neurocentric view of meditation. In: Amir Raz and Robert Thibault (eds.), Casting Light on the Dark Side of Brain Imaging. Academic Press, 2019

Preprint | Publisher

“Meditation is trending right now. From classrooms and hospitals to business meetings and phone apps, our culture is enthralled by meditation as a powerful tool to train our brains and shape our private mental lives—to make us happier, more productive, and more peaceful on the inside. But meditation is not just about training our brains. It’s a deeply social—and fundamentally embodied—collection of cultural practices. If we reduce meditative practices to just a set of brain patterns, we miss the richness of how these practices work and ignore much of what they have to teach us about our own subjective experience.

Keywords: Mindfulness; Meditation; Neuroscience; Enactive cognition; Embodied cognition