Archives for posts with tag: Vajrayana

40001263_0Yael Bentor, Meir Shahar (eds.). Chinese and Tibetan Esoteric Buddhism. Brill, 2017. (450 pages, ISBN 978-90-04-34049-7)

Toc | Google Books | Publisher

“Bringing together leading authorities in the fields of Chinese and Tibetan Studies alike, Chinese and Tibetan Esoteric Buddhism engages cutting-edge research on the fertile tradition of Esoteric Buddhism (also known as Tantric Buddhism). This state of the art volume unfolds the sweeping impact of esoteric Buddhism on Tibetan and Chinese cultures, and the movement’s role in forging distinct political, ethnical, and religious identities across Asia at large.

Deciphering the oftentimes bewildering richness of esoteric Buddhism, this broadly conceived work exposes the common ground it shares with other Buddhist schools, as well as its intersection with non-Buddhist faiths. As such, the book is a major contribution to the study of Asian religions and cultures.”

Holdings: UBW, Worldcat

 

9780199391219DiValerio, David. The Holy Madmen of Tibet. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. (352 p. ISBN 978-0-19-939121-9)

Publisher description | Toc | Book preview

“Throughout the past millennium, certain Tibetan Buddhist yogins have taken on profoundly norm-overturning modes of dress and behavior, including draping themselves in human remains, consuming filth, provoking others to violence, and even performing sacrilege. They became known far and wide as “madmen” (smyon pa, pronounced nyönpa), achieving a degree of saintliness in the process. This book offers the first comprehensive study of Tibet’s “holy madmen” drawing on their biographies and writings, as well as tantric commentaries, later histories, oral traditions, and more.

Much of The Holy Madmen of Tibet is dedicated to examining the lives and legacies of the three most famous “holy madmen” who were all of the Kagyü sect: the Madman of Tsang (author of The Life of Milarepa), the Madman of Ü, and Drukpa Künlé, Madman of the Drukpa Kagyü. Each born in the 1450s, they rose to prominence during a period of civil war and of great shifts in Tibet’s religious culture. Read the rest of this entry »

journal.pone.0102990.g006Amihai I., Kozhevnikov M. Arousal vs. Relaxation: A Comparison of the Neurophysiological and Cognitive Correlates of Vajrayana and Theravada Meditative Practices. PLoS ONE 9.7 (2014): e102990. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102990

Full text

Abstract: “Based on evidence of parasympathetic activation, early studies defined meditation as a relaxation response. Later research attempted to categorize meditation as either involving focused or distributed attentional systems. Neither of these hypotheses received strong empirical support, and most of the studies investigated Theravada style meditative practices. Read the rest of this entry »